The Beauty of the Cantaloupe

The Beauty of the Cantaloupe

Can something this sweet, juicy, and tasty actually be good for your body and help promote younger looking skin? Some nutritionists are saying, “yes, it can.” If cantaloupe is not a staple item on your weekly grocery list, it just might become one after learning all of the health benefits of this fruit.  A relative of squash and cucumber, the cantaloupe is a member of the gourd family and is packed with an arsenal of artillery to battle everything from lung cancer and diabetes to macular degeneration. Now being harvested at Colchester Neighborhood Farm, there’s no better fruit to add to your grocery list than this muskmelon.  Read on for some more interesting and valuable information about the cantaloupe.

  • According to our friends at thehumblegardner.com, cantaloupe gets its name from the town of Cantalupo, Italy where seeds from Armenia were planted in the Papal Gardens in the 16th century.
  • An average sized cantaloupe packs an abundance of flavor and natural sweetness but contains just 100 calories.
  • Loaded with vitamin A and antioxidants such as beta-carotene, lutein, and other nutrients, cantaloupe may be your best defense against colon, prostate, breast, endometrial, lung, and pancreatic cancers.
  • According to the website, greatist, cantaloupe could be called the beauty fruit. The beta-carotene in its orange pulp converts to vitamin A, which helps promote healthy skin and may help protect against damaging and harmful UV rays. This dynamic melon may halso help to prevent wrinkles and premature aging of the skin.
  • And cantaloupe isn’t just for eating—it doubles as the perfect hair conditioner during the summer months. Use a fork to mash half a cup of cantaloupe, then massage into hair and leave for ten minutes after shampooing. http://greatist.com/health/superfood-cantaloupe
  • The best way to tell when a cantaloupe is ready for harvesting is when it has naturally slipped off of its vine.
  • To find the sweetest tasting melon, use your nose. The fruit should have a sweet, slightly musky scent. A good cantaloupe will feel heavy for its size, has a rind that resembles raised netting and a stem end will feel slight soft when you press your thumb into it.
  • When storing a cantaloupe, the melon can be left at room temperature for a few days, which helps in the ripening process. Once ripened, the melon will last for a week if kept cold. Cut melons, wrapped in plastic with the seeds left in, should be refrigerated but should be eaten in a few days.
  • According to the website, softschools.com, always wash cantaloupe before cutting into it. The surface of the melon is often covered with bacteria that can induce serious diseases in humans and that bacteria can be carried into the edible pulp when a knife slices through the melon.
  • Melons can be cut into halves, quarters, wedges, cubes, or scooped into balls with a melon baller. According to the website,bellybites, most melons will benefit from a squeeze of lemon or lime juice to enhance the flavor and served at room temperature.

Now at the height of  harvest season, there is no better time to head to Colchester Neighborhood Farm to pick up some organically grown cantaloupe. It’s as good on the taste buds as it is for the body.